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Climate Change Effects can be Seen to the Waters off North England

Update Date: Oct 30, 2015 09:36 AM EDT
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Latest study in the field of global warming has revealed that the increasing temperatures of the water off the coast of New England have debilitating consequences. The number of cod fishes has declined and led to the collapse of cod fisheries as a result of warm waters. This is the latest finding in the series of incidences like massive snowfall in Boston last winter, that the scientists somewhat blame the warm seas for to an inexplicable rise in sea level, signifying intense changes in this particular stretch of water, reports Washington Post.

Between 2004 and 2013, there has been consistent increase in the warming of waters that has never been witnessed in any other ecosystem over a period of 10 years, said lead author, Andrew Pershing from the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. Pershing is involved in an extensive research in collaboration with not only his own institution but also others from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder and Stony Brook University in New York. According to the paper, within the period of study, the ocean region falling between Cape Cod northeast to Nova Scotia's southern tip the waters have reportedly warmed up by 0.23 degrees Celsius per year.

Within this period, responding to the warming seas, the fishery managers reduced the quota of cod fish but not entirely. This is because of the lack of information about the warming waters and its subsequent effects on the fish. As a result, the cod fish stock is now only 4% of its actual optimum size, reports MMC News. Owing to the great dangers to the marine life, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has imposed restrictions on cod fishing in this area.

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