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Many Home Blood Pressure Monitors Inaccurate, Study

Update Date: Oct 28, 2014 05:52 PM EDT
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Many home blood pressure monitors don't work properly, according to new research.

Researchers found that home blood pressure monitors are inaccurate in up to 15 percent of patients.

The latest study, which will be presented at American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week 2014 November 11¬-16 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA, compared measurements from home blood pressure monitors with validated mercury sphygmomanometers, which are used in doctors' offices, in 210 patients.

The study revealed that 63 out of the 210 home systolic blood pressure readings were more than 5 mm Hg different and 16 were more than 10 mm Hg different from the mercury systolic blood pressure measurement. The study also revealed that 67 of the home diastolic blood pressure readings were more than 5 mm Hg different and 18 were more than 10 mm Hg different from the mercury systolic blood pressure measurement.

"Home blood pressure monitors may be inaccurate in 5% to 15% of patients, depending on the threshold for accuracy used," lead researcher Dr. Swapnil Hiremath, MD, MPH, of Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, in Canada, said in a news release.  "We recommend all patients with home monitors get them validated with their health care providers at least once."

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