Thursday, July 09, 2020
Stay connected with us

Home > Science/Tech

Archaeologists Unearth 3,300-Year-Old Egyptian Tomb With Pyramid Entrance

Update Date: Apr 02, 2014 09:09 AM EDT
Close

Archaeologists have unearthed a 3,300-year-old tomb boasting a pyramid 7 meters high at its entrance. The tomb has been found at the site of Abydos. 

Archaeologists found that within one of its vaulted burial chambers, there existed a finely crafted sandstone sarcophagus painted red for a scribe named Horemheb. The sarcophagus has images of several Egyptian gods on it. 

According to archaeologists, no mummy was found in the sarcophagus and the tomb was ransacked at least twice in antiquity while humans surviving it. 

"Originally, all you probably would have seen would have been the pyramid and maybe a little wall around the structure just to enclose everything," said Kevin Cahail, a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, who led excavations at the tomb in a press release. 

"The pyramid itself probably would have had a small mortuary chapel inside of it that may have held a statue or a stela giving the names and titles of the individuals buried underneath," Cahail told Live Science

At present, only the thick walls of the tomb entranceway that would have formed the base of pyramid exist. The other parts of the pyramid are destroyed for reason unknown to researchers. 

"They could actually be emulating their names on these very powerful individuals that eventually became pharaoh, or they could have just been names that were common at the time," Cahail said.

"It's a beautiful object and possibly one of the best carved examples of these very rare type of amulets," Cahail added. "It was probably on the chest of one of the deceased individuals and there probably would have been some sort of necklaces and gold and things like that."

See Now: What Republicans Don't Want You To Know About Obamacare

Get the Most Popular Stories in a Weekly Newsletter
© 2017 Counsel & Heal All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation