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Researchers Find Several Reasons Why Boys Are ‘Weaker Sex’

Update Date: Nov 18, 2013 08:02 AM EST
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Previous researches have already proven that baby boys are weaker sex and to back this finding researchers from Britain have discovered some specific reasons.

Professor Joy Lawn, director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine’s Centre for Maternal, Adolescent, Reproductive & Child Health believes that while the boys greatest risk is preterm birth, they are also more prone to infections, birth complications and jaundice.

“For two babies born at the same degree of prematurity, a boy will have a higher risk of death and disability compared to a girl,” Lawn recently said in a statement, according to UPI News. “Even in the womb, girls mature more rapidly than boys, which provides an advantage, because the lungs and other organs are more developed. One partial explanation for more preterm births among boys is that women pregnant with a boy are more likely to have placental problems, pre-eclampsia and high blood pressure, all associated with preterm births.”

Evidently in some less developed part of the world, girl child becomes more prone to death because of less nutrition and medical care. Their higher biological survival chance is of no use in those societies.

The study also said that out of 15 million babies born, one million of them die due to prematurity. This is around one-third of the total newborn deaths.

In the developed nations around 80 percent of babies born under 37 weeks manage to survive. Those born at fewer than 28 weeks suffer higher risks of death and disability.

Even though infants who survive preterm birth, they are more likely to face a lifelong problem related to physical and mental disability. Statistically, baby boys are 14 percent more likely to take preterm birth than baby girls.

The study is published in the journal Pediatric Research.

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