Monday, October 26, 2020
Stay connected with us

Home > News

Restaurant Fines Diners For Not Finishing Meals

Update Date: Feb 15, 2013 02:56 PM EST
Close

If you have a habit of not finishing your meals in restaurants, then you should certainly avoid this one in Sapphoro, Japan. According to an intrepid blogger, the restaurant will dole out a fine if you fail to eat every last bite of their dishes.

According to Rocket News, the restaurant in question is called Hachikyo, which has made ikurua, or salty salmon roe, one of its specialties. Salmon roe, or the egg masses found in the fish's ovaries, have earned the moniker "rubies of the sea".

The restaurant has on its menu the "tsukko meshi", which consists of a bowl of rice with as much salmon roe as a person can eat. However, in order to order the dish, the restaurant requires patrons to eat every last grain of rice and roe. If they do not, they will need to pay a donation. This policy is in place because the fishermen ultimately responsible for the plate are in a rough line of work; conditions are so difficult that lives have been lost. According to Soshiok, this is done out of appreciation for the fishermen's line of work.

According to Yahoo News, it is not clear how large that the fine levied to the customer is. However, it appears to be rare that someone does not finish the meal. Besides, the fine is for a good cause, after all.

The restaurant also asks that patrons participate in a chant when the salmon roe is served.

The promotion appears to be a popular one. The Huffington Post reports that the restaurant has been open for eight years, and that the owners are planning on opening a second location soon.

The meal was so delicious that the writer licked his plate clean. The dish apparently costs about $20 to $25, which is considered reasonable, and comes with free refills.

See Now: What Republicans Don't Want You To Know About Obamacare

Get the Most Popular Stories in a Weekly Newsletter
© 2017 Counsel & Heal All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation