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Hospital Admissions Due to Alcohol on a Rise in England

Update Date: Jun 02, 2012 11:22 AM EDT
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More and more number of people are taken to hospital for alcohol related ailments each year with a steep increase of 10 percent in the total number of alcohol consumers every year in England.

According to NHS figures, around 1.2 million people were taken to hospitals for liver disease, alcohol poisoning, or due to injuries sustained while drunk.

The figure does not even include patients who were treated at emergency centers and released after some time. The figure is a representation of the number of people who had some severe conditions and had to be shifted to some other wards.

The number of admissions this year has doubled, compared to the last decade when they were first recorded.

The figures show a total of 1,168,300 admissions in 2011, which is 11% more compared to 1,056,900 admissions in 2009/10. The figures have seen a steep rise compared to the 510,800 admissions in 2002/3.

Also, drugs that help people get rid of alcohol addiction by making them sick as soon as they drink, were prescribed to 167,800 people this year, which is a 5% increase compared to last year when 160,300 people were prescribed the same.

It costs NHS a total of £2.5million every year for drugs used to treat alcoholics.

"As a country we face a huge NHS bill because of health problems caused by alcohol," Emily Robinson, of the charity Alcohol Research was quoted as saying by Mail Online.

"That means we need the government to take action across a whole range of policy areas such as advertising, pricing, availability and investing in treatment to help bring down the number going to hospital because of alcohol," she added.

The full report by NHS can be read here.

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