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A hormone Discovered by Scientists that can Cure ‘Sweet-Tooth’

Update Date: Dec 29, 2015 02:38 PM EST

Scientists have discovered the hormone that can suppress "sweet tooth" cravings. The findings published by the researchers in journal Cell Metabolism, could help the patients in improving their diet if they are diabetic or obese. Most people suffer from sugar cravings during the holiday season but the psychological mechanisms that activate the sweet tooth have not yet been defined as of now. However, the latest study on mice reveals that the hormone, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is produced in the liver that can suppress the craving of simple sugars. According to the researchers, FGF21 is made in the liver due to high carbohydrate levels. When this hormone enters the bloodstream, it signals the brain to quell the need for sweets. The co-senior author of the study, Dr. Matthew Pothoff, assistant professor of Pharmacology in the University of Iowa in US said, "This is the first liver-derived hormone we know that regulates sugar intake specifically." The researches conducted previously explain how certain hormones impact the appetite. However, these hormones do not control any particular macronutrient such as protein, carbohydrate or fat, and ae produced by organs except liver, said Azertac.

"We've known for a while that FGF21 can enhance insulin sensitivity," says Lucas BonDurant, a Co-first author, "Now, there's this dimension where FGF21 can help people who might not be able to sense when they've had enough sugar, which may contribute to diabetes." He added, "Now, there's this dimension where FGF21 can help people who might not be able to sense when they've had enough sugar, which may contribute to diabetes." The research is based on genome-wide studies of humans where the researchers found a link between DNA mutations and intake of specific macronutrients. Some of these mutations were close to the FGF21 gene that helped the researchers in identifying its role in regulating the preference of macronutrients, reports Jewish Business News

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