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Young Adult Brains Affected by Too Much TV and Too Less Exercise, Says Study

Update Date: Dec 04, 2015 03:36 PM EST
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According to a latest study, young adults who watch too much TV and do not exercise much may slow their brains. Researchers at JAMA Psychiatry studied more than 3,000 people for 25 years. They followed them around the age of 25 and then after 25 years, they studied their cognitive abilities. The people who participated in the study filled out questionnaire regarding their TV viewing habits as well as the physical activity. Those participants who watched more than 3 hours of TV everyday and exercised very little had twice the potential of scoring below average on two thinking tests. The researchers said, the tests were aimed at ability to plan and execute a task and also their thinking speed, reports Wish TV

Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, revealed that the good news is that people have the option of changing this by watching less TV and getting more exercise. According to Tina Hoang, researcher at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Francisco, said that if the study was happening in today's time, it will take into account the time spent by young adults in screens other than TV. She added that reading a book on a mobile device or playing a challenging video game may not be as bad as watching TV, says USA Today.

The results of the research also suggest that engaging any kind of physical activity rather than watching TV is crucial for healthy brain, said Tina Hoang. "Being physically active at any time in your life is good for your brain," she added. The adults who do not exercise much and binge watch TV can see the adverse impact on their brain's health as early as midlife, according to Live Science.

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