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New York to Spend $67 Million on Alzheimer’s disease Caregivers

Update Date: Nov 02, 2015 05:01 PM EST
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New York State will be spending $67 million on Alzheimer's disease caregivers, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Monday. The funding is a part of the governor's Alzheimer's Cargiver Support Initiative.

"Alzheimer's Disease affects thousands of New Yorkers each year and takes a devastating toll on both patients and the caregivers," Governor Cuomo said reported by myChamplainValley.com. "This investment will provide a wide range of support and respite services for caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's and similar diseases."

The funding will be divided among nine organizations that will be receiving $7.5 million each year. The organizations will be in charge of creating programs aimed at helping people who are caring for a family member with the degenerative brain disease.

The nine organizations that will be receiving the money are: Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association, Hudson Valley/Rockland/Westchester, NY Chapter, Research Foundation for SUNY Plattsburgh, Catholic Charities of Buffalo, Lifespan of Greater Rochester, Inc., Northeast Health Foundation, Inc., Parker Jewish, Institute for Health Care and Rehabilitation, Sunnyside Community Services, Inc., New York University School of Medicine, and Presbyterian Senior Services, Inc.

The funding will hopefully increase access to support groups, consultations, respite services and outreach. With more access, caregivers could take a break when needed and create a strong support system that would be very beneficial when times are tough.

About 380,000 New Yorkers are currently living with Alzheimer's or another type of dementia. The number of cases, however, is expected to jump up to 460,000 by 2025.

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