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Dino Fossils Airlifted from the Wilderness by the National Guard

Update Date: Oct 30, 2015 09:35 AM EDT
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In a rare scene that has not been witnessed before, the remains of a plant eating dinosaur, baby Pentaceratops, complete with large horns and skeletal remnants has been discovered. These dinosaurs are said to have roamed North America millions of years ago. These fossils were first discovered by a paleontologist working with New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science when he was trekking through Bisti wilderness in New Mexico, back in 2011. That was when they realized that the remains need to be excavated and brought back to the museum for study, reports Fox News.

It took many years before they were authorized to use National Guard Blackhawk Helicopter to pull out the fossils of the baby dinosaur. The skull was airlifted from the wilderness and into the cargo truck waiting to get the remains back into the museum. There was another skull of an older Pentaceratops that too was airlifted from the same site, ten miles away. Even though the muddy conditions made it difficult to transport the remaining body parts of the skeleton but mostly the mission was successfully executed. The remaining parts will be excavated later. Since the crews had to work in unfavorable conditions of the wild forest, the traditional methods of excavation and removal of fossils could not be used. The museum curator said that the mechanized equipment and the vehicles were not allowed inside that made it difficult to get the fossil out, said Daily Mail.  

The crew on the job had to take over hundred pounds of plaster and several water jugs with heavy tools to carry out the task. Only a handful of skulls have been unearthed in the past century which makes it the first baby skull to ever be removed, as per Kob.

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