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Productive Practices to Employ in Your Everyday Life

Update Date: May 16, 2020 02:08 AM EDT
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Productive Practices to Employ in Your Everyday Life
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Staying active, productive, and keeping your mind at work, is a great way of staying healthy and happy. This is particularly true during lockdown, when it can feel easy to slip into a rut of laziness, without any clear-cut schedule. But with monotony talking its toll and resulting in a serious lack of motivation for many, how do we keep on top of a consistent workflow and schedule?

Stuck for inspiration on how to stay productive and pro-active during the self-isolation, and also generally in your everyday life going forward? Take a look at this short list that we've compiled, detailing some practices that you might want to try and employ where possible.

Meditation

A great way to start the day for many is to sit and collect your thoughts, learning to calm yourself and focus in before starting work or activity. This is something that has become mainstream in recent years, and with smartphone apps such as Headspace showing you how to do it in bite-sized chunks, you can get started rather quickly. If you find yourself worrying or stressing out about being stuck inside, then this very well might be a good thing to add into your schedule.

For many, meditation is the subject of much scepticism, and admittedly it might not be a technique for focus and mental wellbeing that works for everybody, but if you've got a little bit more time on your hands of a day during lockdown and want to give it a try, it's easier than ever.

Saving and investing your money

These uncertain times have affected many different people financially, and an important step to think about is getting your finances in order to make sure that you're stable and secure going forward. Sit down, take a look at your outgoings, and think about what you might be able to cut down and avoid. You might find that being locked inside you're naturally saving some money anyway, so put that away into a savings accounts and start to accumulate a pot if you haven't already.

Another thing that you could think about doing during lockdown is investing some of your money for the future if you're not using it, building towards your financial freedom and future. Most people don't have savings or financial plans for the long-term, and so if you can break the norm then you'll be in an advantage looking forwards. Use the internet to your advantage, looking to companies such as RWinvest for free guides, videos and podcasts on different aspects of the investment world, and things to look out for along the way. There's a ton of free content out there to learn.

Honing a skill/craft

There are plenty of different ways that you can entertain yourself during lockdown if you're stuck for things to do, and learning a valuable skill or training a talent you have will ensure that you have something to show for your favourite hobby. Again, consider learning investment, or maybe how-to code, play an instrument, or even learn a new language.

If you don't have the time to learn a new skill fully, then why not plug the gaps in your spare time when you have a break, dinner etc. to learn different things in short bursts through your smartphone, rather than just mindlessly searching through social media and wasting your time? Again, smartphone apps can help you to learn things incrementally, so you don't feel like you're grinding and studying to learn something new. Apps such as Duolingo, a free language programme, gamify the learning process so that you enjoy learning new words and progressing.

We hope this short guide has helped to provide some inspiration on what might be the best way to stay productive. What does your personal lockdown routine entail?

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