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Antarctica Turning From Glacial To Green, Global Warming & Climate Change Responsible For Conversion

Update Date: May 25, 2017 10:46 PM EDT
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GoPro video shows Antarctica from a penguin's point of view

The effect of global warming is gradually getting worse in Antarctica, the coldest place on the planet. The continent is turning green with the constant rising in temperature and this is creating a huge impact on the growth of moss, as scientists have discovered.

The Greenery And Moss Occurrence In Antarctica Is 4-5 Times Higher Now

The study published in Current Biology revealed that scientists have identified significant change-points in all the sites and proxies and then suggested fundamental and widespread alterations in the terrestrial biosphere. The greenery occurrence in the Arctic is parallel to the changes taking place in the Antarctica.

The constant alternations in moss levels were previously tracked by analyzing carbon after 1950. The temperature in the Antarctic has so far risen by around half a degree Celsius each decade, as the rate is quite faster than the global average.

According to The Independent, the growth rate of moss and greening of Antarctica is happening four to five times the level before 1950. This study is performed by the UK-based researchers who had studied three sites sprawling across 1000 km stretch across the peninsula.

Scientists are looking to consider 1950 as the start of the new geological era termed Anthropocene. This name is kept due to the surprising global effects that modern humans are having on this planet.

Green Parts Of Antarctica Are Likely To Be Greener Due to Global Warming

According to one of the researchers at the University of Exeter, Matthew Amesbury, people usually think of Antarctica as a very icy location. Now, recent research work shows that some parts of this icy continent are green and these parts are likely to be getting greener.

“Even these relatively remote ecosystems, that people might think are relatively untouched by humankind, are showing the effects of human-induced climate change,” Amesbury added, as reported by The Star. Stay tuned for more updates on global warming.

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