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Are you “almost depressed”? A New Book Series Aimed At Helping Those Who Are

Update Date: Nov 04, 2013 07:00 PM EST

Psychologists believe there is a difference between being depressed and being "almost depressed" and having anxiety or being "almost anxious."

Two books co-authored by Harvard University faculty members Shelley Carson and Luana Marques, released this month, shows insight on how others can determine what they think they are, along with personal remedies. 

According to Harvard, the books are, "aimed at people who have previously fallen through the cracks in a care system that tends to look at health as binary: You're either sick or well."

They added, "Instead, the series acknowledges that there is a continuum between being entirely well and clinically ill and that early help can not only alleviate current suffering but also head off more serious illness down the road."

Carson said that being occasionally sad is normal when experiencing a setback whether financially, academically or in a relationship. However if those feeling of sadness do not go away you can be on your way to "almost depressed."

"When several days turn to weeks, that's a sign it's more than a normal blue mood," Carson said. "A lot of people are 'almost depressed' but don't realize they are."

He added, "They're just getting by for a long time and don't realize that just getting by is not the way we're supposed to live our lives."

Some remedies for people who are "almost depressed" are highlighted in Carson's co-authored book. Increasing exercise, being a part of creative activities, reducing stress and goal-setting are among a few. 

"Almost Depressed: Is My (or My Loved One's) Unhappiness a Problem?" is written by Jefferson Prince and co-authored by Carson. 

"Almost Anxious: Is My (or My Loved One's) Worry or Distress a Problem?" is written by Eric Metcalf and co-authored by Marques.

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