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New Machine Turns Sweat into Drinkable Water [VIDEO]

Update Date: Jul 19, 2013 03:38 PM EDT
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Your next cup of water could be your own sweat. A new machine created in Sweden supposedly can recycle one's sweat into drinkable water. Although this might sound disgusting to some people, it could be the answer for several third world countries that do not have safe water to drink. The machine was created to help highlight UNICEF's (the United Nations Children's Fund), campaign regarding the lack of clean water throughout the world. Water is a human necessity. People who unfortunately cannot acquire any of it are living their lives in grave danger every day. This machine could potentially help with that global issue.

According to the creators, the machine is capable of removing sweat and turning it into clean water. The process works by placing a damp t-shirt, which is wet due to sweat, onto the device. The device will spin and heat the sample up in order to remove the sweat from the fabric. The vapor that results from that process then goes through a special membrane that has been created to only allow water molecules to pass. Once the water molecules pass, the end result is a clean bowl of water. The creators, who launched this machine on Monday, stated that the water it produces from the sweat is cleaner than local tap water in Sweden.

"It uses a technique called membrane distillation," creator, Andreas Hammar said to BBC News. "We use a substance that's a bit like Goretex that only lets steam through but keeps bacteria, salts, clothing fibers and other substances out. The amount of water it produces depends on how sweating the person is. "

As of right now, the device is stationed at the Gothia Cup, which is the larges international youth football tournament throughout the world.

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