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Experts Test New Medication For Diabetes; Know How It Helps Produce More Insulin [VIDEO]

Update Date: May 06, 2017 07:08 AM EDT
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Diabetes is a condition that occurs when the beta cells of the body stop producing insulin. There is no permanent cure for this but recently, there are reports about a new possible treatment for the disease.

What Is This New Possible Treatment?

EurekAlert reported that a possible remedy for Type 1 diabetes appeared on the range in San Antonio. The innovative procedure would also let Type 2 diabetics to halt insulin shots.

The publication also added that the process conducted at The University of Texas Health Science Center, now named UT Health San Antonio, increases the varieties of pancreatic cells, which produce insulin. The procedure was tried on rats, but the UT Health San Antonio is planning to perform the procedure on humans in the next three years.

Further Studies About The Treatment

Science Daily reported that the University Of California San Diego School Of Medicine conducted a research about the development of pancreatic beta cells treatment for diabetes. The analysis was led by Dr. Maike Sander, a professor from the Department of Pediatrics and Cellular and Molecular Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

The body produces beta cells in utero and they recommence to reconstruct after birth, but as people get older, cell reconstruction decreases. The effective method to develop new beta cells is throughout cell division, but beta cells competency of dividing are limited, arbitrating less than one percent of all beta cells.

In their research, Sander's unit distinguished the pathways that are working when beta cells divide and that is giving insight into potential drug purposes. Applying single-cell RNA sequencing, the team was able to characterize microscopic characteristics and metabolic action of different beta cells to discover how dividing beta cells diverge from non-dividing cells.

Whether stimulating beta cells to develop will follow curative interventions for diabetes, experts believed that they need to conduct more studies if the treatment will be essentially effective for humans. Stay tuned for further updates about this new possible treatment.

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