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Diabetes Treatment New Developments: Type 2 Diabetes Reversal With New Drug

Update Date: Apr 08, 2017 11:11 AM EDT

Researchers from the University of California developed a drug that may do a reversal for Type 2 Diabetes. The diabetes treatment new developments make use of the inhibition of an enzyme called LMPTP to restore the insulin sensitivity of diabetics.

The team led by Stephanie Stanford has offered a solution to Type 2 diabetes patients. In the form of one pill, they ambitiously aim to reverse diabetes, which is something that has never been done before with just medication.

Reversing Diabetes

They studied mice that are fed a high-fat diet, which, due to obesity, developed high blood sugar levels. The rodent is then given a daily dosage of the drug that constrains the enzyme called low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMPTP).

The presence of the LMPTP activity in the diabetes treatment new developments is found to cause the reduction of the sensitivity of the cell to insulin. When the insulin weakens, the body will have a hard time regulating blood sugar level that leads to the development of the Type 2 diabetes.

With the drug, diabetes reversal can be achieved as the reduction of LMPTP can restore the cell's function. Moreover, the mice in the study showed no adverse side effects according to

As of now, more studies should be made before the drug will be proven to be safe enough to move on to human clinical trials. Stanford, meanwhile, is confident on their drug to become the new therapeutic strategy for Type 2 Diabetes reversal.

Over the years, being diagnosed with diabetes has continued to spiral upwards. From 1980 to 2014, over 422 million people are found to be diabetics.

In the US alone, there has been a 40 percent increase in diabetes cases from 5.5 million in 1980 to 22 million in 2014. The continued efforts for diabetes reversal with the many diabetes treatment new developments give hope to the millions of people with the condition.

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