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Whole-Body Vibration Could Help Prevent Obesity and Diabetes, Study Reveals [VIDEO]

Update Date: Mar 20, 2017 07:14 AM EDT
Obesity Epidemic Hits California
SAN FRANCISCO - APRIL 06: A man walks along the Embarcadero April 6, 2005 in San Francisco. According to a study released Tuesday, almost 53 percent of Californians over 25 are overweight, and more than 17 percent are obese, or extremely overweight and are costing nearly $21.7 billion a year in medical bills, injuries and lost productivity.
(Photo : Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A study suggested that exercise and its alternative, whole-body vibration, have the same effect on the body with regard to weight management. This discovery could help people with obesity and diabetes achieve weight loss and better health.

The study published this week in the journal Endocrinology used two groups of mice. One group consists of normal mice and the other was predisposed to obesity and diabetes. They were genetically unresponsive to leptin, also called the satiety hormone. This hormone helps regulate food intake and energy balance.

The two types of mice were further divided into three: one group had WBV for 20 minutes a day, the second walked on the treadmill for 45 minutes a day and the third did not do any exercise-all for 12 weeks. After comparing their weights, it was discovered that in comparison to the obese and sedentary mice, the obese mice gained less weight after WBV and exercise. The normal mice were still not as heavy as the obese mice. The obese had an increased muscle mass and insulin sensitivity from both the exercise and WBV.

The results with WBV seem promising to people who are not able to exercise due to a number reasons. It does not replace exercise but obese and diabetic people may still benefit from it. However, it is important to note that the trials were done on mice, so the WBV will have to be tested on humans to prove its effectiveness to humans, the Medical News Today reported.

One of the leading causes of death among adults under the age of 70 in the U.S. is obesity. Thirty-five percent of adult Americans are obese and 17 percent of children and adolescents from 2011 to 2014 are affected as well, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It increases their risk for diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, stroke, gall bladder diseases, difficulty breathing, osteoarthritis and cancer.

To avoid chronic diseases resulting from obesity, regular physical activity coupled with a healthy diet is often recommended.

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