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Emotional Skills Should Be Taught In School

Update Date: Feb 28, 2017 10:17 PM EST

Educators suggest that emotional skills should be added to the school's curriculum. It was mentioned that emotions should weigh the same as math, English, and science.

The majority of the adults could not recall as to how their emotions were taught. Most would mention that their emotions innately developed, which would often lead to confusion growing up as some may have a hard time in managing it, especially the young adults.

TED-Ed suggests that emotions should be part of the school curriculum, especially during early childhood. A research which was done in lieu of emotions, it was pointed out that people who are "emotionally skilled" perform better not only in school but also with their social skills and their relationships.

Emotional skills can branch out to different aspects when it comes to one's over-all performance. It aids the person's persistence, stress management, and communication skills. It also allows the individual to be more secure when it comes to their self-worth.

Children are often taught to suppress their emotions, wherein they would be asked to toughen up when they feel scared, or hold-it-in when they're in rage. University of California-Santa Barbara sociologist Thomas Scheff, mentioned that adults from the western society would often pertain to emotions as a distraction, thus they tend to be dull, stiff and stern when it comes to dealing with emotion-related conflicts.

Some, on the other hand, would refer to emotions as an indulgence, thus children are often taught to turn their feelings of shame into a different emotion such as anger, aggression, and violence.

Marc Brackett, David Caruso and Robin Stern of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence came up with a way to teach emotions to young children. The team of three developed RULER in 2005 which is now used in more than 1,000 schools not only in the United Sates but also abroad.

  

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