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Remote Island To Remove Junk Food To Fight Obesity

Update Date: Feb 20, 2017 07:20 AM EST

Cookies, sugary drinks, imported noodles and canned fish are just some of the food items that will be limited and will no longer be served in government meetings and tourist establishments. This is one of the moves Hong Kong is implementing to keep the obesity problem in their country in check.

NY Times reveal that besides Hong Kong, Vanuatu, a remote island in the Pacific is planning to create a law banning important food, soda and other sugary drinks and food items from being served in government functions. Tourist establishments will also be prohibited from serving such food items in all the 13 provinces of the inhabited island. This is the island's move to promote local organic food while reducing the incidences of obesity in the area. The ban will take effect on March 2017.

Local coconuts, lobsters, and lime juice will serve as the replacement for these sugary items in Vanuatu. This practice is already observed in Vanuatu's capital, Port-Vila. Junk foods that are imported to Torba might take two years before completely banned and may include the intervention of the national government.

A recent study posted at the Huffington Post also reveals that exercise is really not enough to lose weight or to maintain a healthy weight. Obesity is not only caused by a lack of activity bust as well as a person's food choices. Previous research has already revealed the greater risk of obesity due to consumption of high-calorie food and sugary drinks.

In fact, a two-year study revealed that people who exercised more than other gained weight due to their food choices compare to those who exercise less but chose a more healthier diet program.

The island council took inspiration to Samoa's 2007 ban on importing turkey tails that have a high-fat content. However, the WTO ordered Samoa to remove the ban in 2011 as a condition for the country to be an eligible member of the World Trade Organization.

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