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Researchers Achieve Wireless Power Transfer At 5-Meter Distance

Kamal Nayan
April 18, 2014 11:10 AM EDT

Everything including internet has gone from wired to wireless but power. In quest to remove the last remaining wires scientists have been working on developing wireless power transfer technology and have recently achieved a breakthrough. 

Researchers reportedly developed the "Dipole Coil Resonant System (DCRS)" for an extended range of inductive power transfer that supports distance up to 5 meters between transmitter and receiver coils. 

The first breakthrough in wireless power transfer is considered to be the introduction of the Coupled Magnetic Resonance System (CMRS) in 2007, which used a magnetic field to transfer energy for a distance of 2.1 meters. 

In comparison, DCRS is significantly smaller than CMRS measuring 3 m in length, 10 cm in width, and 20 cm in height.

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"With DCRS," said Chun T. Rim, a professor of Nuclear & Quantum Engineering at KAIST in the press release, "a large LED TV as well as three 40 W-fans can be powered from a 5-meter distance."

"Our technology proved the possibility of a new remote power delivery mechanism that has never been tried at such a long distance. Although the long-range wireless power transfer is still in an early stage of commercialization and quite costly to implement, we believe that this is the right direction for electric power to be supplied in the future. Just like we see Wi-Fi zones everywhere today, we will eventually have many Wi-Power zones at such places as restaurants and streets that provide electric power wirelessly to electronic devices. We will use all the devices anywhere without tangled wires attached and anytime without worrying about charging their batteries."

The research result has been published in the March 2014 issue of IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics.

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