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Climate Change And Its Impact On Agriculture And Human Life; Indiana University To Invest $55 Million

Update Date: May 11, 2017 10:06 PM EDT
Climate Change
Here's some latest updates on climate change. (Photo : YouTube / The Daily Conversation)

A $55 million project is going to commence to study the effect of climate change on agriculture and the quality of life. This project is going to be launched by Indiana University.

According to school officials, this beautiful effort is to understand the impact of climate change on almost all the overall pillars of human life. The announcement was made by Michael McRobbie, the University President on Wednesday (May 10).

What Could Be The Outcome Of This New Study?

According to the US News, this effort to understand the phenomena will augment the number of new instructors. It is also supported by a few major businesses, including the maker of diesel engines, named Cummins Inc.

The source also revealed that the research will be guided by Biology Professor Ellen Ketterson. According to Ketterson, this extensive study on climate change will bring solutions to natural disasters, like flooding caused by severe weather. Apart from this, it will also assist farmers to cope with alterations in pollination and look into the process of restricting the spread of avian disease.

Three Signs Or Three Threats To Indiana As A Consequence?

Scientists have discovered three signs that show of climate change's huge impact on human lives. The three signs - typical weather with minimum rain followed by summer drought, intrusive species spoiling farmers’ fields at a large scale, and tripling of Lyme disease in Indiana in the last five years, as reported by IndyStar.

The new study will help forecast environmental or climate change and envisage the real fact that how it can affect the businesses and residents in Indiana. “There aren’t lot of people who sit around the university or anywhere else and think about environmental change in those terms. What we see is a lot of people who are confronting elements of environmental change,” IU Vice President for Research Fred H. Cate said.

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