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Lactate Analyzed for Its Role in Cancer Cell Formation [VIDEO]

Update Date: Mar 20, 2017 07:37 AM EDT
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A new research is being conducted by experts to be able to understand the crucial role of lactate in the development and spread of cancer cells. Lactate is a byproduct of the chemical process glycolysis, or breaking down of sugar into glucose, and is produced during intense exercise.

Glycolysis is a natural chemical process in the body that breakdowns sugar into smaller molecules called glucose to produce energy. This process occurs during intense exercise sessions.

However, lactate can also accumulate in the tissue and the blood. Such occurrences can lead to poorer physical performance as well as muscle stiffness. It was also found out that when more lactate is produced than normal cells, it may trigger cancer cell formation, Medical News Today explained.

The new research conducted at the University of Colorado-Boulder's Sports Medicine and Performance Center was performed to fully understand how cancer cell consumes a lot of glucose compared to normal cells. This phenomenon is known as the Warburg effect.

The study was also able to establish the role of lactate in angiogenesis or the formation of internal tumors in the body. In the study, it was discovered that lactate creates an acidic environment outside the cancer cell, a condition that supports spreading of cancer cells. Experts also concluded that to be able to stop cancer, stopping lactate production is a must, the University of Colorado Boulder website further elaborates.

The study also explored the link between lactate and genetic components. Experts arrived at the hypothesis that a triad of transcription factors found mostly in cancers HIF-1, CMYC and p53 also triggers lactate deregulation.

Results of the study also explain why regular exercise is necessary to lower the risks of developing cancer. Those who work out regularly are trained to turn lactate into energy needed by the body to support physical activities.

Meanwhile, those who exercise less but produces too much lactate, that is not converted into energy presents a setting stage for cancer.

 

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