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Woman Woke Up To Find Out She Gave Birth To Stillborn Baby

Update Date: Mar 07, 2017 10:47 AM EST

Kerry Tellwright, 34, woke up from a coma and was told her newborn son, Archie, had died at birth. She suffered from HELLP syndrome, which caused her liver and spleen to rupture and her son stillborn at 39 weeks. 

The devastated mother from Stoke-on-Trent was able to cuddle Archie after his body was kept in a special frozen cot for three weeks. She and her fiancé Craig Hill, 47, have been trying to have a baby for eight years after two rounds of IVF and an early miscarriage of twins.

Daily Mail reported during her 38th week she started to experience pain in her left shoulder. Ten days later she was rushed to the hospital and on their way there she suffered three seizures. First was in their car, second on the roadside where a stranger pulled over and called 999 and lastly in an ambulance en route to the hospital.

The pain in her shoulder was transferred pain from her liver that was failing, which is a symptom of HELLP syndrome. It is a type of pre-eclampsia and a rare liver and blood clotting disorder that can affect pregnant women. The only way to treat the condition is to deliver the baby as soon as possible according to The Sun.

Doctors rushed her to give her a C-section, Archie was stillborn and surgeons discovered Kerry suffered extensive internal bleeding. They had to remove her spleen and put her into induced coma. She spent seven days in coma.

When she woke up she was able to hold her son's body for the first time. Kerry has decided to share the photos in a bid to raise awareness of HELLP syndrome.

A charity group, Remember My Baby, took photos of the family with their stillborn son so that the couple would have treasured memories of Archie. Kerry urges pregnant women to learn more about HELLP syndrome.

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