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Teething May not be the Reason for your Baby’s Fever, Says Study

Update Date: Feb 24, 2016 11:14 AM EST

Many parents believe that when their child is cranky, not eating, drooling and not sleeping enough, they may be experiencing the teething problems. However, despite the advice that the parents have been following for years, a new study in the journal Pediatrics confirms that fevers are not caused by teething infants, rather it may be pointing to another illness that the parents and doctors shouldn't just ignore.

"If a child has a really high fever, or is in significant discomfort, or won't eat or drink anything for days, that's a red flag for concern," said Dr. Paul Casamassimo, director of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry's Pediatric Oral Health and Research and Policy Center, CNN reports

However, the study did not completely write-off a parent's intuition. It was revealed that the most common symptom of teething was swollen gums, crankiness and drooling. However, these symptoms should not last more than three to five days, said Casamassimo.

"By and large, symptoms are not a chronic thing. They come and go, and the job of the parent is to comfort the child, and keep their finger on the pulse of their child. Is the child eating? Staying hydrated?" Casamassimo said. The study pointed out that the teething can lead to an increased body temperature but it is still below 101 degree Fahrenheit. The study also said that teething also leads to loss of appetite, rash, vomiting, diarrhea and sleeping problem. "Just comfort your child and get through it," said Casamassimo. He said a cold rag or teething toy may help with the discomfort.

Casamassimo said that in case of distress, they can also use pain relievers but the parents should be careful in its regular use can lead to tooth decay, as reported by KUTV.com

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