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Selfies Linked to Low Self-Esteem

Update Date: Sep 19, 2014 04:32 PM EDT
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Selfie addicts here is some news. A new study out of UK has found that selfie addiction is associated with low self-esteem.

According to Business Standard, the study found that among those who regularly took selfies, confidence levels about their appearance was low and most of them reported not being comfortable in their own skin. The study involved 2,071 UK adults aged between 18 and 30. Of these 39 percent said they like prefer taking their own pictures over that of family members, friends or pets. These findings were reported by money-saving app Voucher Cloud.

"When the regular selfie-takers were asked how they felt about their appearance and relationships, only 13 per cent said they felt 'confident in their own skin' and 60 per cent admitted to having 'low self-esteem," Business Standard reported.  

Selfies became a rage in recent years, prompting phone manufacturers to produce devices with high resolution wide-angle front facing cameras. Most selfies are posted on the internet. The UK study too found that 73 percent of selfie addicts surveyed uploaded images on social media.

Reporting on reasons behind the self-portrait obsession, Free Press Journal said the most common reason was to earn likes and appreciation from peers on social media. Other reasons included capturing the moment when they thought they looked their best and conveying their mood through a photo.

"What is important to remember is that a selfie is subject to lighting, Photoshop and a whole host of other factors, so often people actually look very little like they do in real life. Equally, for the selfie addicts, it is important to make sure that they don't base all their self-esteem on a few comments or likes on a picture - there's a lot more to a person than their selfie!" Matthew Wood, MD of vouchercloud.com told Free Press Journal.

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